tori tsukune nabe

Aden has got this thing for meatballs recently. 

Since he is a rather picky eater, I am more than happy (okay, I am over the moon) when he wants to eat meat of any sort.

I always try to cook whenever I can, especially for my kids, because I prefer to know what exactly is going into the food I feed people. 

So today, I cooked Tori Tsukune Nabe, which is basically chicken meatballs that have been poached in a dashi and soy-based broth, in the style of a nabe, which is a steamboat style of cooking.

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I do apologise for the very few photos in this post, but this dish is so easy to cook, there simply weren’t many pictures I could take.

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Here’s how.

Start by making the meatballs. Cut boneless and skinless chicken thigh into smaller pieces and add them into a food processor bowl. Alternatively, you can use store-bought minced chicken.

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Pulse to mince the meat. Add the egg, grated ginger, leeks (I omitted this), soy sauce and cornflour, and pulse again until well-combined. Set this aside.

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Prepare the vegetables. Here, I want to show you my Tovolo Magnetic Tri-Peeler (soon to be available in Tovolo Singapore’s on-line store). This peeler cuts the carrot (or whatever vegetable) into julienne – there is no mess and no excessive liquid. This is great for salads and after washing, I stick the peeler on my fridge. Since it is magnetized, it stays there until I need it again.

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Add water, dashi, sake, mirin and light soy sauce into a pot. Bring it to a gentle simmer.

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Shape the meatballs – I used an ice-cream scoop, but you can use 2 spoons if you wish.

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Drop the meatballs into the broth and simmer until the chicken is cooked.

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Transfer the meatballs into a bowl, and bring the broth to a boil.

Assemble the vegetables and meatballs in a bowl and ladle the piping hot broth into the bowl. The heat from the broth will cook the vegetables.

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I served this with some rice, but for a low-carb version, simply eat it as it is.

This is so light, and fresh, it is a meal on its own.

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Tori Tsukune Nabe
Serves 4
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Ingredients
  1. 2 teaspoon instant dashi or dashi stock
  2. 1/4 cup (60ml) cooking sake
  3. 1/4 cup (60ml) mirin
  4. 1/3 cup (80ml) low-salt light soy sauce
  5. 1/2 small carrot, cut into julienne
  6. 8 fresh shitake mushrooms, stems removed
  7. 100g enoki mushrooms, trimmed
  8. 125g Chinese cabbage (wombok), thinly sliced
For the meatballs
  1. 500g minced chicken - I used chicken thigh
  2. 1 egg
  3. 1cm ginger, finely grated
  4. 1 tablespoon finely chopped white part of leek - I omitted this
  5. 3 teaspoons (15ml) light soy sauce
  6. 1 tablespoon corn starch or potato flour
Instructions
  1. Make the meatballs. Cut boneless and skinless chicken thigh into smaller pieces and add them into a food processor bowl. (You can also use store-bought minced chicken)
  2. Pulse to mince the meat. Add the egg, grated ginger, leeks, soy sauce and cornflour, and pulse again until well-combined. Set this aside.
  3. Prepare the vegetables. Set them aside.
  4. Add water, dashi, sake, mirin and light soy sauce into a pot. Bring it to a gentle simmer.
  5. Shape the meatballs. Drop them into the broth and simmer until the chicken is cooked.
  6. Transfer the meatballs into a bowl, and bring the broth to a boil.
  7. Assemble the vegetables and meatballs in a bowl and ladle the piping hot broth into the bowl. The heat from the broth will cook the vegetables.
Adapted from Feast Magazine
Adapted from Feast Magazine
The Domestic Goddess Wannabe http://thedomesticgoddesswannabe.com/




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