tao suan with you tiao (豆爽油条) | split mung soup with chinese cruller

If you had grown up in Singapore, you would have grown up with Tao Suan, which is a Chinese sweet dessert made with split mung beans.

I rarely eat tao suan, but when the craving strikes, it really hits me hard. I don’t like the tao suan sold at the shops these days. Most contain loads of starch and are super sweet. Yucks.

The last time I cooked this at home, I wasn’t impressed with the results. I used the traditional method of cooking, which involves steaming the beans then cooking them in water. I didn’t like how mushy the beans became after all that cooking.

And then, I found this recipe.

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No steaming required and the beans stayed whole! Also, you can control how soft the beans are by varying the cooking time. Best if all, the amount of sweetness can also be adjusted. 

I love it!

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Let me show you how easy it is to cook some tao suan at home.

First, soak the split mung beans in room temperature water for 5 minutes. At the end of this time, drain away the water.

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In a pot, add water and pandan leaves. Bring this to a boil and then let it simmer for about 10 minutes on low heat.

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In a NON-STICK frying pan, fry the mung beans with 3 tablespoons of sugar on low heat. Keep stirring until the mung beans are caramelized. This will take about 8 to 10 minutes. You will see a change in color – the mung beans will turn a deeper shade of yellow.IMG_0332 IMG_0335 IMG_0340Discard the pandan leaves. Carefully transfer the mung beans into the water.

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Bring the water to a boil and allow the mung beans to continue boiling for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on how soft you like the mung beans to be.

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Add sugar to taste.

In a bowl, add the room temperature water to the sweet potato flour. Whisk until combined.

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Turn off the heat and pour the sweet potato slurry in a thin, steady stream into the mung bean soup. Remember to stir constantly while you add the slurry.

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Once the soup has thickened, it is done.

Serve hot, with some cut you tiao (油条).

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Enjoy!

WORKSHOPS 

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Date: Friday 10 March 2017

Workshop: Hands-on Valrhona Marble Butter Cake and Lana-Inspired Chocolate Fudge Cake Workshop

Time: 9.30am – 12.30pm

Venue: Butter & Bake

Tickets Link > CLICK HERE

Date: Saturday 15 April 2017

Workshop: Hands-on Valrhona Marble Butter Cake and Lana-Inspired Chocolate Fudge Cake Workshop

Time: 9.00am – 12.00pm

Venue: The Eureka Cooking Lab

Tickets Link > CLICK HERE

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Date: Thursday 2 March 2017

Workshop: Hands-on Pandan Chiffon & Hokkaido Milk Cocoa Chiffon Cakes Workshop

Time: 9.30am – 12.30pm

Venue: Butter & Bake

Tickets Link > CLICK HERE

Date: Saturday 8 April 2017

Workshop: Hands-on Pandan Chiffon & Hokkaido Milk Cocoa Chiffon Cakes Workshop

Time: 2.30pm – 5.30pm

Venue: The Eureka Cooking Lab

Tickets Link > CLICK HERE

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Date: Wednesday 1 April 2017

Workshop: Hands on Mango Yogurt Chiffon Cake Workshop

Time: 9.00am – 11.00pm

Venue: The Eureka Cooking Lab

Tickets Link > CLICK HERE

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Date: Saturday 8 April 2017

Workshop: Hands-on Ondeh Ondeh Cake with Gula Melaka Swiss Meringue Buttercream Workshop

Time: 9.00am – 12.00pm

Venue: The Eureka Cooking Lab

Tickets Link > CLICK HERE

Tao Suan With You Tiao (豆爽油条) | Split Mung Soup With Chinese Cruller
Serves 4
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Ingredients
  1. 1.5 litres water
  2. 1 bunch pandan leaves
  3. 250g split mung beans
  4. 3 tablespoons caster sugar (for cooking with beans)
  5. 50g sweet potato flour
  6. 50ml water
  7. 2-3 tablespoons caster sugar
  8. 1-2 sticks you tiao
Instructions
  1. First, soak the split mung beans in room temperature water for 5 minutes. At the end of this time, drain away the water.
  2. In a pot, add water and pandan leaves. Bring this to a boil and then let it simmer for about 10 minutes on low heat.
  3. In a NON-STICK frying pan, fry the mung beans with 3 tablespoons of sugar on low heat. Keep stirring until the mung beans are caramelized. This will take about 8 to 10 minutes. You will see a change in color – the mung beans will turn a deeper shade of yellow.
  4. Discard the pandan leaves. Carefully transfer the mung beans into the pandan leaves.
  5. Bring the water to a boil and allow the mung beans to continue boiling for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on how soft you like the mung beans to be.
  6. Add sugar to taste.
  7. In a bowl, add the room temperature water to the sweet potato flour. Whisk until combined.
  8. Turn off the heat and pour the sweet potato slurry in a thin, steady stream into the mung bean soup. Remember to stir constantly while you add the slurry.
  9. Once the soup has thickened, it is done.
  10. Serve hot, with some cut you tiao (油条).
Adapted from Makansutra
Adapted from Makansutra
The Domestic Goddess Wannabe http://thedomesticgoddesswannabe.com/



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